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ioLight meets Dutch and British Royal Families

It was an enormous privilege to meet members of the British and Dutch Royal Families the ioLight microscope with Their Majesties the King and Queen of The Netherlands and Their Highnesses the Earl and Countess of Wessex at the Netherlands UK Innovation showcase yesterday as part of the Dutch State Visit to the UK. The conversation was really interesting and the royal party showed a strong understanding of how a laboratory grade pocket microscope could change the world. Prince Edward observed that our price was about the same as a pair of binoculars.

Huge thanks to the Royal Family for posting this wonderful video so quickly.

The Pathologist reviews “Small but Mighty” ioLight microscope

Small, But Mighty

Does microscope portability always mean a compromise in image quality? Possibly not…

The Pathologist, July/August 2016

The Pathologist says: Picture a laboratory and many of us get the same image: a set of benchtops crowded with equipment from thermocyclers to hot plates. Dominating the scene is the king of the lab, a large microscope with a bulky stage, illuminator, and perhaps even a computer or digital camera attachment. We’ve all seen – probably even worked in – laboratories just like this. But this kind of setup doesn’t work for everyone, especially pathologists who are “on the road” teaching, training, or working in remote field environments. Those pathologists need an entirely different kind of microscope – but unfortunately, their options to date have not been great. Portable microscopes usually mean a compromise on image quality, whereas the instruments that could provide the detail and resolution needed for definitive diagnosis are too large, sensitive, and resource-intensive for field use. It’s clear that we need a better solution – and that’s where I hope our new take on field microscopy comes in.

At a Glance

  • Current microscopes, both optical and digital, tend to offer either high-resolution images (<1 μm) or easy portability – but rarely both
  • Devices that can be taken into remote field situations or used for teaching often lack stages, stands and illuminators – features necessary for capturing high-quality images
  • We have developed a new model of digital microscope that uses a foldable design to combine sample support and illumination with portability
  • Devices like these pave the way to not only better patient care – especially under difficult conditions – but also teaching, training and public engagement

See the full article at https://thepathologist.com/issues/0716/small-but-mighty/ (Free login required for the full article)

Demonstration video: Using a high resolution microscope in the field

Video demonstration by ioLight co-founder Andrew Monk of just how easy it is to use the microscope. Andrew dips into the ponds of the beautiful Millennium Meadow in Whitchurch, and finds some interesting pond life. He shows just how simple it is to set up the microscope and capture images and videos of microscopic protozoa directly onto an iPad. With a resolution of 1 micron, the microscope captures even the smallest of pond life.

The full specifications and pricing of the microscope are available at iolight.co.uk .

Thanks for watching – please share.

ioLight microscope live in Manchester on 21st and 22nd January

ioLight has been invited by the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester this week on Thursday 21st and Friday 22nd January to demonstrate our Magnificent Mobile Microscope.

The two days are targeted at school visits and we are looking forward to seeing our latest prototypes in the hands of young scientists visiting the museum. The museum is also open to the public and we would very much welcome visits from other friends of the company. Come and see amazing images like this beautiful lacewing and live videos of protozoa and algae too.

ioLight has filed a patent application for the world’s first truly portable high resolution microscope. It displays clear images and videos of individual cells and other subjects onto the screen of an iPad – so no more squinting through eyepieces at a blurry mess. Instead we will show you how the instrument resolves details just 1 micron across – that’s a thousandth of a millimetre! Images and videos can be shared from the iPad using social media or pasted into reports, homework or Nobel Prize winning research reports.

The ioLight microscope will be on sale to science labs and museums later this year and then we will work on a low cost version for schools and families.

This is the first time that we have had microscopes that look like the production units that we will launch later this year. It is also the first time that we will be demonstrating wireless connection and image capture on an iPad.
We look forward to meeting you and showing you our progress. It would be helpful if you could let us know you are coming, so we can make sure that we are available.